10 Non-generic Alternatives to “I Hope This Email Finds You Well”

10 Non-generic Alternatives to “I Hope This Email Finds You Well”

- Published: - 8 minutes read

“I hope this email finds you well” is used so much in emails that it has become a cliche. It’s used out of politeness in formal emails to show interest in the recipient’s health.

However, these days it can come across old-fashioned or can sound lazy and formulaic.

In this article, we’ll explore several better alternatives to start an email.

Let’s dive in, shall we?

10 alternatives to ‘I hope this email finds you well’:

1. Don’t use a well-wish greeting at all

Often, we feel the need to pad out an email with greetings because we think we should.

However, this can detract from what’s important. When you want to grab someone’s attention, clearing your throat with generic greetings like “I hope this email finds you well” prevents people from getting to the meat of your message. So, consider removing this line entirely.

2. Go hyper-personalized

If you’re reaching out to someone you know, with a little effort, you can find something personalized to them to open your email with.

Look them up on LinkedIn, check for recent news on the company blog, or find something recent to enter the conversation already happening inside your recipient’s mind to get their attention.

Examples:
  • Congratulations on opening your new (location).
  • I hope you enjoyed your time at (conference).

3. Explain ‘why you’ and ‘why now’

If you’re reaching out to someone for the first time, your recipient is likely thinking, “Who is this? And why are they emailing me now?” One of the best ways to start an email is by instantly explaining this.

Examples:
  • We met at…
  • (mutual connection) said I should reach out to you…
  • I see your post on LinkedIn about…
  • It was great seeing you…

4. I hope you had a great weekend/week

Depending on when your email goes out, you can switch between “week” and “weekend”.

This is a great greeting alternative to “I hope this email finds you well” with more of a warm and caring tone. And a great way to start both formal and informal emails.

5. I know you’re busy, so I’ll keep this quick

This greeting is an effective way to let your recipient know the contents of this email won’t take long to digest. This is great if you want to increase your chances of your email getting read and responded to.

6. I hope you’re haivng a productive week

If you’re emailing one of your colleagues whom you’re working closely with on a project, this is a great way to show you’re thinking about their progress.

7. I’d love an update on [deliverable]’

If you’re working with a partner or colleague on a project, this is an effective opener to cut to the chase and nudge them along. You can go a step further and explain why you’d like an update in the following sentence.

8. It was great to see you earlier at (event)

Whether you’re following up with someone after a recent meeting or strengthening bonds with new connections, explaining again who you are and reminding someone of your recent interaction is a great way to paint a fresh picture in a recipient’s mind.

9. How was the ‘event/meeting’?

This is a great opener that shows you’re interested in what the other person has been up to. People always love it when someone has been paying attention to them.

10. How are things with you?

If it’s been a while since you reached out to a contact you already know, this is a great way to get them to share how things are going on their end. I like this email opener because it’s human nature to love it when someone shows an interest in you.

6 crucial email opening practices to keep in mind:

1. Keep it relevant

Where possible your best bet is to start with what is in the front of someone’s mind (pain points, recent events) or whatever else is relevant to your main message. This prevents your email from looking lazy or generic.

2. Make it personal

Personalizing openers to each recipient is a way to make the recipient feel important. When sending mass emails this is important to prevent your email from looking generic.

Tools like Mailmeteor can help you add custom opening lines to an email template for multiple recipients.

3. Get to the point

In some cultures, people feel they have to begin professional emails with a bunch of well wishes. However, this extra “fluff” disrespects your recipient’s time and lessens your chances of getting a response. Keep it short.

4. Don’t overthink it

How you start an email isn’t the be-all and end-all. Find something that works and run with it. Over time you can try different approaches.

5. When in doubt, err on the side of formality

If you’re unsure if you are on informal terms with a recipient, it’s best to err on the side of formality.

6. Don’t go over the top

Some people think they need to get clever and say unnatural things like, “You don’t know me, but I’m [name]”. When in reality, you just need to write how you talk and get to the point.

Want to personalize mass email to each recipient?

Hopefully, by now you’ve got some alternatives to “I hope this email finds you well”.

While catch-all email greetings can work, the best way to open an email is to tailor it to each recipient.

If you want to email several people at once and still address them by name, pairing it with a mail merge platform for Gmail like Mailmeteor makes it even better.

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FAQs about I hope this email finds you well

Is it correct to say I hope this email finds you well?

Yes. However, it’s a bit overused these days and somewhat old-fashioned. In this guide, we explore several better alternatives to start your emails.

What can I say instead of hope you are well in an email?

“I hope you had a great weekend”. Comment on something more personal to the recipient e.g. a recent meeting or trip. “I hope you’re having a productive week”. “How are things with you?” For a full list of alternatives check out this guide.

What do I hope this email finds you well mean?

It means you hope the message finds the recipient in good health. It’s used so much and quite old-fashed – it’s become a meme these days.

How do you start an email with I hope you are doing well?

You should start with a greeting and the recipient’s name (e.g. Hi Mr. Musk). Then, you can start with an email opener like I hope this email finds you well, or many alternatives. Followed by the body of your email.

What can I say instead of hope you are well in an email?

You can use email openers like I hope you had a great weekend. Comment on something more personal to the recipient e.g. a recent meeting or trip. I hope you’re having a productive week. How are things with you? For a full list of alternatives check out this guide.

How do you start a professional email greeting?

For a professional email, you should start with a greeting and the recipient’s name (e.g. Dear Mr Musk). Then, you can start with an email opener like I hope this email finds you well, or many alternatives.

For a full guide on how to start an email. Plus informal and formal introductions check out this guide.

This guide was written by Harry Lawson, content editor at Mailmeteor. Mailmeteor is a simple & privacy-focused emailing software. Trusted by millions of users worldwide, it is often considered as the best tool to send newsletters with Gmail. Give us a try and let us know what you think!

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